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lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

aurusallos:

thatscienceguy:

cool-critters:

Kea (Nestor notabilis)
The Kea is a large species of parrot found in forested and alpine regions of the South Island of New Zealand. The Kea is the world’s only alpine parrot. Its omnivorous diet includes carrion, but consists mainly of roots, leaves, berries, nectar, and insects. Kea are known for their intelligence and curiosity, both vital to their survival in a harsh mountain environment. Kea can solve logical puzzles, such as pushing and pulling things in a certain order to get to food, and will work together to achieve a certain objective. Called “the clown of the mountains”, it will investigate backpacks, boots, or even cars, often causing damage or flying off with smaller items. Despite being classified as Nationally Endangered in the New Zealand Threat Classification System and Vulnerable in the IUCN Red List and protected by law, Kea are still deliberately shot. photo credits: User:Chmehl ,Dilaudid ,keabiz

They’re also the most intelligent parrot, and possibly even the most intelligent bird overall.
Watch this David Attenborough documentary all about how smart they are - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ak6omNRd6-g

"KEAAAAAAAAA"
"And of course there’s a David Attenborough thing."

Ahh, the kea. This bird is a beauty. Save it!
Zoom Info
lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

aurusallos:

thatscienceguy:

cool-critters:

Kea (Nestor notabilis)
The Kea is a large species of parrot found in forested and alpine regions of the South Island of New Zealand. The Kea is the world’s only alpine parrot. Its omnivorous diet includes carrion, but consists mainly of roots, leaves, berries, nectar, and insects. Kea are known for their intelligence and curiosity, both vital to their survival in a harsh mountain environment. Kea can solve logical puzzles, such as pushing and pulling things in a certain order to get to food, and will work together to achieve a certain objective. Called “the clown of the mountains”, it will investigate backpacks, boots, or even cars, often causing damage or flying off with smaller items. Despite being classified as Nationally Endangered in the New Zealand Threat Classification System and Vulnerable in the IUCN Red List and protected by law, Kea are still deliberately shot. photo credits: User:Chmehl ,Dilaudid ,keabiz

They’re also the most intelligent parrot, and possibly even the most intelligent bird overall.
Watch this David Attenborough documentary all about how smart they are - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ak6omNRd6-g

"KEAAAAAAAAA"
"And of course there’s a David Attenborough thing."

Ahh, the kea. This bird is a beauty. Save it!
Zoom Info

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

aurusallos:

thatscienceguy:

cool-critters:

Kea (Nestor notabilis)

The Kea is a large species of parrot found in forested and alpine regions of the South Island of New Zealand. The Kea is the world’s only alpine parrot. Its omnivorous diet includes carrion, but consists mainly of roots, leaves, berries, nectar, and insects. Kea are known for their intelligence and curiosity, both vital to their survival in a harsh mountain environment. Kea can solve logical puzzles, such as pushing and pulling things in a certain order to get to food, and will work together to achieve a certain objective. Called “the clown of the mountains”, it will investigate backpacks, boots, or even cars, often causing damage or flying off with smaller items. Despite being classified as Nationally Endangered in the New Zealand Threat Classification System and Vulnerable in the IUCN Red List and protected by law, Kea are still deliberately shot. photo credits: User:Chmehl ,Dilaudid ,keabiz

They’re also the most intelligent parrot, and possibly even the most intelligent bird overall.

Watch this David Attenborough documentary all about how smart they are - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ak6omNRd6-g

"KEAAAAAAAAA"

"And of course there’s a David Attenborough thing."

Ahh, the kea. This bird is a beauty. Save it!

sixpenceee:

And here they are:

Thermoception:  Ability to sense heat and cold. Thermoceptors in the brain are used for monitoring internal body temperature.

Proprioception: The sense of where your body parts are located relevant to each other. 

Chronoception: Sense of the passing of time. Your body has an internal clock. 

Equilibrioception:  The sense that allows you to keep your balance and sense body movement in terms of acceleration and directional changes. 

Magentoception:  This is the ability to detect magnetic fields. Unlike most birds, humans do not have a strong magentoception, however, experiments have demonstrated that we do tend to have some sense of magnetic fields. 

Tension Sensors:  These are found in such places as your muscles and allow the brain the ability to monitor muscle tension.

Nociception:  In a word, pain.  This was once thought to simply be the result of overloading other senses, such as “touch”, but it has it’s own unique sensory system.  There are three distinct types of pain receptors: cutaneous (skin), somatic (bones and joints), and visceral (body organs).

SOURCE

koryos:

Dominance Behavior in Canids

I didn’t really even WANT to make a post about this.

The alpha-beta-omega model of wolf packs is dead in scientific literature, hammered into the ground, so to speak, and it’s been dead for over ten years. So why am I still hearing about it on TV and reading about it in articles? Why are popular dog trainers that encourage you to “be the alpha” still taken seriously?

I think the unfortunate truth is that the idea that there are strong and ferocious leaders in wolf packs and that you, too, can take on that role with your dog is just somehow appealing to people. Almost romantic, in the older sense of the word. And because of this, it makes money. It sells werewolf media. It sells dog training classes. Educational science channels that have no business promoting this false ideology keep it on board because it gets people watching.

If you couldn’t tell, I’m pretty fed up with the whole thing.

Okay, let’s talk about dominance, particularly what the word even means, because popular media does a terrible job of explaining it.

Read more…

cool-critters:

Tufted Coquette (Lophornis ornatus)
The Tufted Coquette is a tiny hummingbird that breeds in eastern Venezuela, Trinidad, Guiana and northern Brazil. It is an uncommon but widespread species, which appears to be a local or seasonal migrant, although its movements are not well understood. This small bird inhabits open country, gardens and cultivation. Tufted Coquettes are tame and approachable. Their food is nectar, taken from a variety of flowers, and some small invertebrates. The small size and steady flight means that this hummer often resembles a large bee as it moves from flower to flower.
photo credits: Juan Bahamon, alainrichert
Zoom Info

cool-critters:

Tufted Coquette (Lophornis ornatus)

The Tufted Coquette is a tiny hummingbird that breeds in eastern Venezuela, Trinidad, Guiana and northern Brazil. It is an uncommon but widespread species, which appears to be a local or seasonal migrant, although its movements are not well understood. This small bird inhabits open country, gardens and cultivation. Tufted Coquettes are tame and approachable. Their food is nectar, taken from a variety of flowers, and some small invertebrates. The small size and steady flight means that this hummer often resembles a large bee as it moves from flower to flower.

photo credits: Juan Bahamon, alainrichert

scienthusiasts:

Codariocalyx motorius, known as the telegraph plant or semaphore plant, is a tropical Asian shrub, one of a few plants capable of rapid movementThis plant is famous for its movement of small, lateral leaflets at speeds rapid enough to be perceivable with the naked eye. This is a strategy to maximise light by tracking the sun. Each leaf is equipped with a hinge that permits it to be moved to receive more sunlight, but the weight of these leaves means the plant must expend a lot of energy in moving it. To optimise its movement, each large leaf has two small leaflets at its base. These move constantly along an elliptical path, sampling the intensity of sunlight, and directing the large leaf to the area of most intensity. (Wikipedia)

GIF created from this video

It can dance to music, guys! MUSE

strangebiology:

Selections from All Your Yesterdays

Often dinosaurs are drawn by paleoartists as simply skeletons covered in flesh, with no colors or feathers or strange behaviors. All Yesterdays was published to challenge these traditional drawings, and featured art speculating on the bizarre ways that fossil animals could have looked and acted.

For All Your Yesterdayspaleoartists were invited to submit art in speculation of how extinct animals could have looked and acted. This is called speculative evolution. Although none of the colors or actions chosen in the above images are discernible by referencing the fossil record alone, none are impossible either, given our current knowledge of modern and prehistoric animals.

Art Credits:

Christian Masnaghetti's Two-Headed Zupaysaurus. Two-headed animals are not too uncommon; the Venice Beach Freakshow has over a dozen live two-headed red-eared slider turtles. However, the artist concedes that it’s extremely unlikely that a two-headed animal like this one would survive in the wild to adulthood.

H. Esdaile's Tool Use in Jinfengopteryx

Jon Conway’s Giraffatitan brancai (Brachiosaurus) at the Mudbaths

Jon Conway’s Balloon-headed Allosaurus

Rodrigo Vega's Speculative Spinosaurus. The Spinosaurus that is typically portrayed has a crocodile-like snout and a massive sail on his back. Vega illustrates the Spinosaurus with a trunk-like snout and a bison-like hump on his back.

Bethany Vargeson’s Ambulocetus Couple (LostBeasts on tumblr!)

Brian Engh’s Diamantinasaurus in Caves

Vladimir Nikolov's Microraptor with Damaged Feathers

These talented artists all worked for free, so if you like their work please take a moment to visit their pages and shop around. All Your Yesterdays is also free online (liked above) with an optional donation to the editors.

lythronax-argestes-the-gore-king:

aspacelobster:

biologizeable:

avianawareness:

funnynhilariousgif:

Bird with hands »

The hell is this?

That’s a hoatzin! Such a precious dino-beb. The claws are used by the unfledged chicks to scramble around, and are lost in adults.

You know what else is cool? Their hand fuses together to support a wing later in life. Shown below with a chick’s hand above and an adults hand below.

HOATZINS!!!

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